Armenians play Korfball

If someone happens not to know this game I’ll describe it briefly, you can find information  about it here.


Korfball is a Dutch game and it is being  played in Armenian since 1990s. Korfball is a mixed team sport, that combines the best of basketball and netball. The sport originates from Holland. Due to it being mixed, it is the most social sport in the world and this has accounted for its rapid growth, especially within Universities.
 This is the only game where both boys and girls play together in the same team. Each team consists of 4 lads and 4 girls, half in attack and half in defence. Attackers become defenders and vice versa, after of two goals have been scored. It can be played inside (most often) or outside on grass (mainly in the summer). The Korfs (baskets) are 11.5 feet high and as you can't run with the ball, scoring takes quite a bit of practice. The baskets are higher than those of basketball. There is no bouncing in korfball , only passes and no more than 2 steps are allowed.
 

Korfball’s origins can be traced back to a Dutch schoolteacher, Nico Broekhuysen.
Inspired by a game he had played during a summer course in Nääs, Sweden, Broekhuysen devised the game of korfball in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) in 1902. He called it korfball after the Dutch word for basket, ‘korf.’Originally the Dutch korfball association concentrated almost entirely on improving its own organisation and little attention was paid to the internationalisation of the sport. It was only after the formation of the International Korfball Federation in 1933 (comprising the Dutch and Belgian associations) that the further development of korfball came to be seriously considered. Korfball was, however, demonstrated at the Olympic Games of 1920 (Antwerp, Belgium) and 1928 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands).In the first half of the century, the underlying philosophy of korfball often appeared to be too progressive: namely that korfball is played by both sexes on equal terms. But times have changed considerably. We approach the twenty-first century in an era of greater parity between the sexes and, as the only mixed team sport, korfball both satisfies and confirms this trend. Hence, it has embarked upon a rapid expansion, taking korfball further into the Americas, Eastern Europe and South East Asia .Korfball has developed during the twentieth century from an Amsterdam school activity into a truly international sport. Recent progress has been particularly remarkable. The growth in Central and Eastern Europe is spectacular. Korfball in these countries is spreading rapidly and the overall level of korfball skills is improving dramatically. On the international level countries like Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic have ceased to be marginal.Korfball featured in the World Games (a multi-sport competition with about 45 sports disciplines) from 1985 onwards. World Championships have been held since 1978. In 1991 Chinese Taipei became the first non-European country to win (bronze) World Championship medals and four years later the World Cup competition was for the first time held outside Europe, in India.By remaining true to its twin principles of coeducation and co-operation, Korfball is gradually establishing itself around the globe. The IKF is committed to this expansion.

For the rules click here.Now…Great news!!!
The first youth world championship of korfball is going to be held from  March 18  to 20  in Holland. 11 teams will be vying with each other and a group consisting of 16 young people will represent Armenia. Another wonderful news is that 4 of them are from the school where I have finished. Incidentally I know them from my school basketball league, when I was still studying there and time to time  was practicing basketball with them when the coach was absent. After finishing  school I practiced korfball at Polytechnic Institution hall for about a year. No, it was not Polytechnic's team, just we were practicing in its hall. Our team members were real professionals ( not including me, though out of modesty I play well). Most of them had participated in many championships and had successes. But unfortunately or fortunately I got trauma and perhaps that was in the neck of time and I left it.
 
Now I am more than happy to learn  that the children once I used to teach  basketball now practice korfball and moreover, they are going to participate in the 1st youth world championship.   Having passed special examination these 16 young people are chosen from different schools and teams all over Yerevan and there are 2 guys from Charentsavan. One or maximum 2 pupils are chosen from the same group, and the only exception is with these 4 pupils – two girls and two boys. These 16 children have got acquainted less than  a month ago and  they've been practicing together since that. Of course that's a short time for understanding and studying each other and for creating a team spirit. But they are very keen at it and I hope they'll make it. What makes korfball different from basketball is that the individual can not lead the game alone as is the case in basketball. It is totally based on team work, without which no goals can be achieved. I also hope that they will reach that unity and come back with victory. To be realistic, I don't think they'll take 1st, 2nd, or 3rd places, but at least  let's hope that they also won't take  first places from the end.

 They are leaving tomorrow. Let’s wish them  good luck and God speed!!!

10 Responses to “Armenians play Korfball”

  1. Onnik Krikorian Says:

    Armenia Now published an article on Korfball a while ago.

    English Version:
    http://www.armenianow.com/?action=viewArticle&AID=1391&lng=eng&IID=0

    Armenian Version:
    http://www.armenianow.com/?action=viewArticle&AID=1391&lng=arm&PHPSESSID=85837faa0e963747db4b98e0e9b36dff

  2. Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Armenia: Korfball Says:

    […] Zarchka of Life Around Me writes about korfball in Armenia and says she is excited that a team from her country will be playing in the first youth world championship in Holland, where the game originated. […]

  3. Sanne Says:

    Really funny to read something about ‘our’ Dutch game (Korfbal). Didn’t know it was getting so popular abroad, and would never have thought it to be practised by armenians. Korfbal does have a bit of a dull image back here, but I thought that was also because no one else on this planet played the same sport. Now if more and more people play it and it can be seen as an improvement for ‘equality between both sexes’ then I can only hope it will get more and more popular, also back here.

  4. Onnik Krikorian Says:

    Zara, you should credit the use of photography on your site, and especially when they’re professional shots (according to the photo EXIF information they were taken with a Nikon D1h digital camera which is usually used in professional sports photography). This is especially important because these images are probably copyrighted, and also, as a photographer myself, it is not fair to the person who took these shots.

    There are certain legal issues with regards to the use of photos from publications on the Internet, but in the case of a blog, linking to the original publication and crediting their use should be enough to prevent later problems.

  5. Onnik Krikorian Says:

    Also btw: the shots are “squashed.” You should stick in width and heigh attributes for the tag.

  6. Zarchka Says:

    Onnik, these pictures were given me by a friend who is incidentally in the first image and she had brought the CD from Holland and I don’t know where to link from. But thanks for the notification.

    What concerns the fact that the images are “squashed”, you know that I’m trying to work it out by myself and trying to find better ways for posting my photos, as far as you didn’t want to help me in it. And being short of time I don’t manage to devote much time to going more into details. But you know how stubborn I am and I will also make this another thing out, again by my own. Just I need time.

  7. Onnik Krikorian Says:

    As I recall I spent a long time coaching you on how to use wordpress via guiding you online through icq. I also set you up an account on my post and when you migrated to wordpress.com (a mistake given the limitations of the wordpress platform compared to blogsome), I also tried to help you with images.

    Then I simply told you that as you were no in contact with Armyouth who STOLE my ideas and REJECTED an offer of collaboration, then Tamar could help you sort it out. Thanks very much for how much appreciation you have for all the time I spent helping you start blogging.

    Thanks a bunch.

  8. Zarchka Says:

    Onnik, as I said before. I’m much obliged to you for helping me to start blogging, if not you I wouldn’t blog today. Choosing wordpress is quite another question. As I’ve told you before, that was a decisive moment for me. I had to choose whether to take Tamar’s suggestion to blog at armyouth, which you had suggested Tamar, whether come back to your blog, after you had already farewalled me, whether not to blog at all. So I chose to start my own blog. You don’t know but I had opened an account at blogsome still in January, but it was difficult to make it out alone, wordpress seemed easier though primitive, but at least I could start at it. . Neither you, nor Tamar knew about it beforehand As I mentioned in my first blog, I call this period beginning.

    What concerns armyouth, you are mad at them, but it’s your and their problem. I don’t have any connection with armyouth, but Tamar. I estimate people judging by who they are and not the background or the connection they have with this or that thing. Since I haven’t noticed any bad thing coming from Tamar. And for you to know, I never asked Tamar to help me in anything.

    We should have had this talk not like this but eye on eye, but you kind of evaded it. No, I’m not ungrateful, just everything and everyone has its place.

  9. Onnik Krikorian Says:

    Blogsome uses the WordPress platform and is a much better implementation than WordPress.com. Interesting to note that you never ask Tamar for help, yet I’m expected to help to the extent that when I no longer can, you criticize me for not spending hours on such a thing while Tamar betrays my trust and implements ideas that were meant to be a collaboration. If those are your friends, good luck to you, but at least I know that I was right in what I thought was going on. You would have passed on any help I gave to Tamar for a project that will always be flawed because a whole host of very important issues are not understood. Like I said, good luck to you.

  10. Zarchka Says:

    Good luck to you too, we all need it…

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