Back to observation !

It’s not accidentally that I linked to “It’s your Choice”. The thing is that I’m also volunteering for the largest observation mission in Armenia IYC and also represent the Erebuni youth branch. Incidentally that’s the NGO Tim Russo over at  Democracy Guy has worked with and jots down his recollections in his blogsite.

It’s Your Choice is a nonpartisan NGO and the largest domestic election monitor in Armenia with 4,000 volunteers, and offices and chapters in all Marzes and 12 communities of Yerevan. IYC’s mission is to

  • Promote transparent elections and democratic processes in Armenia;
  • Establish true self-governance and accountability within the government;
  • Encourage citizen participation in community governance; and
  • Provide objective, reliable and timely information to Armenian voters.
  •  

    I’ve been volunteering for IYC since 2000 helping them to organize mock elections at schools, but my first observation mission was in 2004, as soon as I ran my 18 years. Since, twice I’ve served as a short- term observer for the European Network of Election Monitoring Organizations’ International Observation  Mission during the 2004 Ukrainian Presidential Elections.  I served as a long–term observer during Nubarashen and as a short-term observer during Erebuni and Malatia-Sebastia local governing institutions’ elections, as well as during  the elections of Constitutional Amendments.
     

    And now IYC is going to observe the coming Ukrainian Parliamentary Elections, which will hold on March 26. I’m hurrying to say that I’m also involved in the group consisting of 30 monitors. . I don’t want to jump the gun with my predictions, but on my coming back I will let you know about the situation governing there during the elections. I hope this one will be more democratic than the previous two ones which were totally rigged. It’s even kind of funny but the Ukrainian Election code allows more falsifications than that of Armenia. They have a house-poll and absentee voting  system and the immense part of fakes occurs mainly in this respect. Besides the counting process is not held by counting the ballots one by one, as is the case in Armenia, but filling the substance of the ballot box on a table and sorting them all together, and many ballots disappear or are changed during that mess. I can mention a row of suchlike cases, but even summing it up, Armenians are much more keen at elections, better to say at its falsification…
     

    Though I’m glad to take part again in Ukrainian Elections, I pity a great deal that because of this mission I lost the chance to participate Tong-Il Moo-Do workshop in Georgia which is from March 20 to March 30. I’ve been waiting for it since May when it was first held in Armenia and though I haven’t practiced for 3 months I intended to get a higher belly. But I hope there will be another workshop-training and I’ll have chance to take part in it. Wait a post  about it later.
     

    For the moment, I’m awfully busy with my studies, especially that I have to pass all the seminars and lectures beforehand, in order not to gain debts on my shoulders when I  return. This is my last post for a while. The schedule is supposed to be very heavy and I don’t think I’ll manage to find time for blogging anything. I’ll be back in a week if everything turns out all right and we don’t stick in the airport, as was the case with Georgian observers on the way to Byelorussia.
     

    For now, wish me good luck and God speed!

    3 Responses to “Back to observation !”

    1. Oneworld Multimedia :: Notes from the Armenian Blogosphere :: March :: 2006 Says:

      […] And talking of elections, Zara from Life Around Me is currently in Ukraine where she’s observing the parliamentary elections as part of a mission from the local Armenian It’s Your Choice NGO. Before she left she had this to say. It’s even kind of funny but the Ukrainian Election code allows more falsifications than that of Armenia. They have a house-poll and absentee voting system and the immense part of fakes occurs mainly in this respect. Besides the counting process is not held by counting the ballots one by one, as is the case in Armenia, but filling the substance of the ballot box on a table and sorting them all together, and many ballots disappear or are changed during that mess. I can mention a row of suchlike cases, but even summing it up, Armenians are much more keen at elections, better to say at its falsification… […]

    2. Nanyaar? Says:

      Hajohutun av Astavatsahokani case🙂

    3. Oneworld Multimedia :: Notes from the Armenian Blogosphere :: April :: 2006 Says:

      […] http://democracyguy.typepad.com/democracy_guy_grassroots_/2006/03/dg_1805_the_gil.html It’s anyone’s guess how the 2007 parliamentary and 2008 presidential elections will be held in Armenia, but I think that most people expect them to be falsified. As control of the parliament will determine either the successor to the incumbent or a possible unconstitutional third term for Kocharian, it’s likely they’re going to be as dirty as hell regardless of MCA funding. Likely the methods of falsification will become more sophisticated instead. Zarchka at Life Around Me writes more on this now she’s returned from Ukraine where she observed their parliamentary elections. Sounds like she was impressed and asks when Armenian will finally hold transparent and democratic elections? […]

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